Sunday, February 28, 2010

Exodus 26:31 - The Inner Curtain of the Tent of the Tabernacle - Parochet

The description moves on to the curtains of the Tent of the Tabernacle. The following verses of the description are talking about the inner curtain of the Tent, that separated the Holly Of Hollies section(The Ark section) of the Tent from the remaining space of the Tent (the Sanctuary/The Lampstand/Table/Altar section).

Lets' take a look:
31 And thou shalt make a vail of blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen of cunning work: with cherubims shall it be made:

‎31 ‏וְעָשִׂ֣יתָ פָרֹ֗כֶת תְּכֵ֧לֶת וְאַרְגָּמָ֛ן וְתוֹלַ֥עַת שָׁנִ֖י וְשֵׁ֣שׁ מָשְׁזָ֑ר מַעֲשֵׂ֥ה חֹשֵׁ֛ב יַעֲשֶׂ֥ה אֹתָ֖הּ כְּרֻבִֽים׃

As you can see, the materials that were used to make the Inner Curtain were pretty much identical to those of the First Covering of the Tent. The design features were also pretty much similar: it had the cherubs...

The Curtain dimensions were 10 cubits by 10 cubits even, with thickness of no more than 4-6mm (about 1/2 of the fingerbreadth)

I have not research an accurate meaning for the expression "מַעֲשֵׂ֥ה חֹשֵׁ֛ב " (of cunning work/work of a craftsman(designer))", so I'll go, for now, with the traditional interpretation.
Rashi commentary on Exodus 26:31 says:

Work of a craftsman.
I have already explained that this refers to [separate] weavings on the two sides and that the images on the two sides were not similar to each other.
http://www.tachash.org/texis/vtx/chverse/+iwwBmeaAz1eclzwwwxFqt0Ldm15qFqAgrwpBnGa+_mFqDeR8qxG5neWykDXvWeuxww/search2.html#hit1

Here is the Front Side (the Sanctuary side of the curtain)

And here is the view from the Top upon the curtain...

And here you can compare both sides of the curtain at once...

And here is the Back Side (The Holly Of Hollies/The Ark side) of the curtain...


Please note, that this is also a very rought approximation of the design of the curtain, so it may not be 100% correct. However, I will show my reasoning behind such design in my next posts.

Friday, February 26, 2010

Exodus 26:30 - An order of assembly of the Frame of The Tent of the Mishkan - Part 3

I have just realized, that this is one of the most overlooked verses in the description of the construction of the Mishkan.

Lets' take a closer look...


Exodus 26:30

30 And thou shalt rear up the tabernacle according to the fashion thereof which was shewed thee in the mount.
‎30 ‏וַהֲקֵמֹתָ֖ אֶת־הַמִּשְׁכָּ֑ן כְּמִ֨שְׁפָּט֔וֹ אֲשֶׁ֥ר הָרְאֵ֖יתָ בָּהָֽר׃ ס
First of all, as we would find out later in the description, the Tent of the Tabernacle was setup first and before everything else. Here is why:
  1. Because Exodus 40:17-18 says so.
  2. It would allow everyone present to see the process
Secondly, even though the expression used is המשכן (the Tabernacle) and not האהל (the Tent), in this particular verse and its context our attention is specifically directed to remember the fact that the Tent was made out of separate parts, which had to be put together in a specific order just like the rest of the structure.


To my best knowledge, not a single commentator (traditional or not) discusses this matter.

And finally, here is a little animated sketch of the order of the assembly of the framework of the Tent of the Mishkan.



It is a rough approximation, as I'm not completely certain yet about an order in which the Tent was put together. However, it covers this highly overlooked detail of the description in the best possible manner that I could think of...

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Exodus 26:30 - An order of assembly of the Frame of The Tent of the Mishkan - Part 2

Lets' take a look at some of the opinions about this verse...
I'll start with a brief overview...

"The sanctuary or tent of meeting, usually called the tabernacle" by George Woolworth Colton

When a permanent camping place was reached, we can imagine all this succession as reversed. The ground surveyed and accurately laid out, a trench for the socket-blocks leveled and the blocks placed in position, and the walls of the tabernacle erected. At the same time the pillars of the court were being planted and braced. Then the curtains were spread both within and without the building and about the court; and finally the holy articles of the interior of the tabernacle were brought in and deposited exactly where they were to remain. No after removal or handling to change position was necessary nor, consequently, permissable.



And here are some of the traditional Jewish views on the matter...

"Agadat ʻEn Ya︠akov, Volume 5" by Jacob ben Solomon Ibn Ḥabib, Samuel Hirsch Glick

We are taught that R. Jose b. R. Juda says : "A fire in the shape of an ark, in the shape of a table and in the shape of a candlestick, came down from heaven, which Moses saw and make like those shapes, for the passage says (Ex. 25, 40) And see that thou make them after their pattern, which is being shown thee in the mount." According to this then the verse (Ib. 26, 30) And thou shalt rear up the Tabernacle according to its • rules thereof which hath been shown thee in the mount, does it also mean [that a fire in the shape of the Tabernacle was shown to Moses] ? Here the passage says, according to its rules, but there [concerning the ark, the table, and the candle-stick] it is written according to their pattern.
And here is a Christian opinion on the matter...

"Lectures delivered before the Young Men's Christian Association ..., Volume 2" by By Young Men's Christian Associations (London, England)
The Form of the Tabernacle, and of all instruments thereof, was shown to Moses in pattern by God. The design was not Egyptian, neither was it Syrian. It was Divine. Great stress was laid upon the exact execution of God's design. God said to Moses, " And let them make me a sanctuary that I may dwell among them. According to all that I show thee, the pattern of the tabernacle, and the pattern of all the instruments thereof, even so shall ye make it." This is repeated by God : " And thou shalt rear up the tabernacle according to the fashion thereof, which was showed thee in the mount." When the brazen altar is described, it is said : " Hollow with boards shalt thou make it; as it was showed thee in the mount, so shalt thou make it." When the work was finished, it is written : " According to all that the Lord commanded Moses, so the children of Israel made all the work. And Moses did look upon all the work, and, behold, they had done it as the Lord had commanded, even so had they done it: and Moses blessed them." The tabernacle was therefore executed according to a pattern shown to Moses by God. By what means the pattern was shown we are not informed. It may have been communicated without the use of any medium, or God may have shown it in lines of fire, and in drapery of clouds and smoke.

Therefore, the use of the expression כמשפטו ("according to the fashion", "according to the rules") is critical in this verse, as it implies that every single thing about the Tabernacle had been explicitly stated and revealed, and thus it is not hidden from understanding of anyone willing to know it.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Exodus 26:30 - An order of assembly of the Frame of The Tent of the Mishkan - Part 1

And this verse is an interesting one...

Exodus 26:30

30 And thou shalt rear up the tabernacle according to the fashion thereof which was shewed thee in the mount.
‎30 ‏וַהֲקֵמֹתָ֖ אֶת־הַמִּשְׁכָּ֑ן כְּמִ֨שְׁפָּט֔וֹ אֲשֶׁ֥ר הָרְאֵ֖יתָ בָּהָֽר׃ ס
The frame of the Tent of the Tabernacle had to be assembled in a very specific order for couple of reasons:

  1. Perhaps some divine order of things had to be honored....
  2. The shape of the frame parts of the Tent, if understood and reconstructed correctly, would allow ONLY ONE possible way to put the frame together.
Since #1 is a little bit out of scope of this blog, I'm going to concentrate on #2 and try to discuss it in some details...

First and foremost, up until now the description covered only major components of the Tent. Inside pillars, Tent curtains and other minor details have not been covered yet by the text.

Nevetherless, I will try to reconstruct a possible order of assembly of the Tent, based on what I have covered so far...

According to Exodus 26:1-30 and Exodus 40:17-18, in order to put the Tent together...

1) All Silver Sockets of the Tent would be positioned and alligned...

2) Western half of the South-West corner board was put in place...

3) Then, the Eastern half of the South-West corner board was put in place, forming first corner board...

4) Three (3) Western Boards and Seven (7) Southern Boards of the Tent were connected to the South-West corner board...

5) Smaller Bars (Top and Bottom Bars) were put in the assembled part of the Western and Southern Walls of the Tent...

6) At this point, the Southern Wall would be left alone, and assembly would continue with the Western Wall of the Tent - Three (3) more boards and the remaining pair of Smaller Bars would be put into their respective places...

7) Then, the Middle Bar would have been put in its place, reaching from one end of the Western Wall to another...

8) The Western Part of the North-West corner board would be put in its place, then, the Northern Part of the North-West corner board would be put in its place, forming the second (North-West) corner board of the Tent.

9) Seven(7) Boards of the Northern Wall of the Tent would be put in their respective places...

10) The Top and Bottom Bars of the Northern Wall would be put in their places...

11) The assembly would continue with the installation of the Thirteen(13) remaining Boards of the Southern Wall of the Tent

12) The remaining pair of Smaller Top and Bottom Bars would be put in their respective places...

13) Then, the Middle Bar would be put in its place, effectively finishing the Southern Wall of the Tent...

14) The assembly would continue with the installation of the Thirteen(13) remaining Boards of the Northern Wall of the Tent

15) The remaining pair of Smaller Top and Bottom Bars would be put in their respective places...


16) And remaining one long Middle Bar would be put in its place, ending the assembly of the Northern Wall and the frame of the Tent...

Of'course, this is a very rough approximation of the order of the assembly of the frame, as even one miscalculation on my part can render the entire procedure invalid. However, it appears to be more or less correct, as if you would try to assemble the Tent in any other manner it simply would not work.

For example, it would be silly to think that the boards would be assembled first and then put onto the sockets.
Or, it would be rather strange to even assume, that one of the boards(or several) would be put in their respective places, after the bars were inserted in the rings of the rest of the boards - that would be simply physically impossible...

Nevetherless, correct procedure of the erection of the Tent of the Mishkan requires further research and careful reconstruction of all the parts that its frame consists of.

Also, it is interesting to note, that the structure could be setup pretty quickly.

Since there were 96 Silver Sockets and 50 parts of the frame (or 48 parts, if you count the corner boards as one part), about 150 people could setup this frame within less than an hour, if they would work together and know what they had to do...

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Exodus 26:29 - Gold Plating the parts of the Tent of the Mishkan - Part 2

Let's take a look at the word in question...

29 And thou shalt overlay the boards with gold, and make their rings of gold for places for the bars: and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold.
‎29 ‏וְֽאֶת־הַקְּרָשִׁ֞ים תְּצַפֶּ֣ה זָהָ֗ב וְאֶת־טַבְּעֹֽתֵיהֶם֙ תַּעֲשֶׂ֣ה זָהָ֔ב בָּתִּ֖ים לַבְּרִיחִ֑ם וְצִפִּיתָ֥ אֶת־הַבְּרִיחִ֖ם זָהָֽב׃
I'm going to gather some facts for you about this expression:

  1. In Tanakh,  in Gen 31:49 (and similar), where related expression "to watch"/to cover(overlay) with attention"/"to freeze in something" is used.
  2. In Tanakh, in 2 Chonicles(Divrey Yamim) 7:3, where related expression "the pavement"/"overlay of the ground" is used.
  3. In Tanakh, in Ezk 17:5, where related expression "as the willow"/"as conspicuous as the willow"/"as covered(overlayed) as the willow covers" is used.
  4. In Tanakh, in Dan 2:15, where related expression "urgent"/"overlayed upon the people" is used.
  5. In Tanakh, in Joel 1:7, where expression "to strip from bark"/"to strip from overlay of the stem" is used.
Now, lets' see where else in Pentateuch this technique is mentioned...

  1. In Pentateuch, in Exodus 27:2(and others), in relation to the Brass/Copper overlay of the Altar of Bunt Offering.
  2. In Pentateuch, in Exodus 38:28 (and others), in relation to the Silver Covers for the pillars of the courtyard of the Tabernacle
There are other similar uses of this expression and its root across the Tanakh, but there is no reason for me at this moment to list them all here...

Let me summarize the facts:
  1. Such overlay of the boards and bars would have to be closely "merged" with its substrate - wood in this case
  2. Such overlay would have to be thin enough so as not to add too much weight and thickness to its substrate - Gold is a very heavy metal.
  3. Such overlay, on the other hand, would have to be thick enough to withstand relatively high temperatures - see the Altar verse. And it would have to cover the substrate in such a way as not to allow substrate to burn out.
  4. Such overlay had to be quite smooth(polished) and evenly applied so that it may fit with other parts where applicable. I.e. staves had to fit perfectly inside the rings of the artefacts and the boards to be functional. Or, overlayed boards of the Tent had to fit perfectly one to another and to their sockets as to provide a light-proof connection.
I think this is it... At least this is all I can see at this moment.

So it had to be some kind of hybrid gilding technique. Or, perhaps some kind of metal coating technique. Or a combination of those...

Here is an excerpt from the book "The pictorial Bible, with notes" by J. Kitto:

34. ' He overlaid the boards with gold.'—The question arises whether in this place and elsewhere gilding, or actual overlaying with plates of metal, is intended. It is observable that the word ' gilding' never occurs in our translation, but 'overlaying' often; and yet there is no reason to question that the Hebrews were at some time or other acquainted with gilding, and it is therefore difficult to conclude that in all cases where the word HB¥ tzippah occurs it means only overlaying with plates of metal; and this may be the rather questioned, since the Septuagint renders it by Karaxpvaia!,' to gild,' and is followed in this by the Vulgate. Modern translators have, however, generally adopted the ambiguous expression, ' to overlay;' yet one of them, Michaelis, uses the term ' to gild' in application to the boards of the tabernacle. When Beckmann was writing his article on gilding, he applied to Professor Tychsen to furnish him with some information as to the Scriptural notices on the subject. The professor, in his reply, states the instances in which gilding or overlaying are mentioned. They are, iu the works of the tabernacle: —the ark, which was covered with gold within and without, and also the staves which belonged to it—the tabic of shew-bread, with its staves—the altar of burnt incense— the boards which formed the sides and the west end of the tabernacle; these were forty-eight in number, each having a surface of about forty-three feet and a half: besides which, there were the five bars on each side, which bound the whole together, and the pillars at the east end, which were also overlaid with gold. Then in Solomon's temple, the parts overlaid with gold were—the whole inside of the house (1 Kings vi. 21, 22): the altar of incense (verse 20-22): the wooden cherubim, above seventeen feet in height (verse 28): the floor (verse 30): the doors of the oracle, on which were carved cherubim, palm-trees, and open flowers, so that the covering gold accurately exhibited the figures of the carved work (verse 32-35). ' Now,' proceeds the professor, ' the question is, whether all these were gilt, or covered, or overlaid with plates of gold, I am acquainted with no work in which this subject is professedly discussed, and therefore I submit the following remarks to your consideration: The expression continually used for overlaying is nSY, the original meaning of which in the Arabic, UL*5, " to be bright, clear," seems still to remain. The signification therefore is, " to make clear, to render bright;" but, as is commonly the case, nothing decisive can be obtained from this etymology; for it is equally applicable to gilding as to overlaying with gold.' In some following observations the professor omits to avail himself of the important corroboration of his own view (that the word translated ' to overlay' means only ' to render bright') which is afforded by the fact, that when overlaying is undoubtedly intended, as in overlaying the altar of burnt offering with plates of copper, quite another word is used (ffij'n}) than that which refers to the covering of the wood-work with gold. Upon the whole, Tychsen concludes, from a comparison of the different passages, that gilding is sometimes intended, rather than overlaying with plates of metal. He considers that the drying of the wood, and the softness of gold, which, in regard to staves, floors, etc., would soon be rubbed off, occasions some difficulty in the notion that plates of metal were employed; but even admitting that such plates could be made sufficiently fast to smooth surfaces of wood, he doubts whether any plates, however thin, could be so applied as to fit and exhibit accurately carved wooden figures and flower-work, as in 1 Kings vi. 35. And, with regard to the parts of the tabernacle, had they been covered with plates of gold, would they not have been too heavy for transportation, particularly as several of them were to be carried on the shoulders of men ? He also states his impression, that the twenty-nine talents and odd shekels of gold could scarcely have been sufficient to cover with plates of gold all the articles above enumerated after so many vessels and other things had been made with pnre gold. Upon the whole, Professor Tychsen thinks that the Hebrews understood both the arts of gilding and of overlaying with plates of metal, and that we must be left to infer from analog)' and probability which process of the two was employed in particular cases.

Some of these arguments seem to us to deserve great attention, and we have little hesitation in allowing their application to the temple of Solomon in the instances to which Professor Tychsen adverts; and, although with somewhat more hesitation, we may allow that collateral considerations give some probability to their application even to a structure so much more ancient and so different as the tabernacle. One of these considerations is, that gilding did not in ancient times imply so much inferiority to overlaying with plates as at present; for the ancient gold-beaters had not the art of reducing the gold-leaf to anything like the tenuity which may now be produced, and hence the ancient gilding was thick, durable, and rich. Another is, that the art of gilding was of very high antiquity iu Egypt. Herodotus mentions Egyptian statues ornamented with gilding; and he also mentions that he saw in the palace of Sais a cow of richly gilded wood, which had been made, in times long anterior to bis own, by Myccrinus (the son of Cheops, the pyramid-builder) to enclose the mummy of his daughter. Even at this day we find traces of gilding on mummies and mummy-cases, and in some instances the mummies appear to have been gilt all over. (See Long's Egyptian Antiquities, ii. 144.) Goguet thinks, indeed, that gilding was not known to the Greeks in the time of Homer. We do not feel that this position is fairly established by the instance he adduces; and if it were so, it is not only easy to conceive, but is certainly true, that the Egyptians had at that time long been acquainted with many arts which were not yet known to the Greeks. Goguet's instance is, that when the heifer which Nestor was about to offer to Minerva had, according to custom, its horns ornamented with gold, the process followed by the operator, who came with anvil, hammer, and pincers, is evidently not that of gilding, but of overlaying with plates of metal. See Origine des Lois, ii. 209.
You can find the book in my Google Library.


I was also asked if the overlay of the boards could've "wavy" reflections like on this image (http://www.animmanstudios.com/images/gallery/tabernacle/tabernacle-showbread.jpg) ?!?...

Well, IT IS POSSIBLE but highly unlikely, as it would mean that the overlay of the boards would be of a relatively low quality. Besides, the boards of the Tent were straight, thus making this assumption improbable.

All "non-straight" elements of the Mishkan, on the other hand, could have had "wavy" reflections due to the curvature... Corner boards, pillars, decorative elements of the cover of the Ark are all good examples...

Also, as I have pointed out in my previous posts, the Tent, from the inside, had to have an appearance of the the so-called Mirror Room to "expand" both the Sanctuary and the Holly Of Hollies of the Tent

Like this...

Also please note, that even high purity gold, if relatively well polished and under bright sunlight and the sky, would have this greenish appearance.
But it would look normal, even more so "golden-like", when under the light from the Menorah and with the coverings on the top of the Tent.

After all, the gold employed in the construction of the tabernacle was of high quality as we can read in Exodus 25:11 and all other verses where the Gold is mentioned - the pure gold - זָהָ֣ב טָה֔וֹר

Here are some trustworthy sources of information for you to check out if you are interested and want to know more:

  1. http://epner.com/applicationexamples.ssi#laser
  2. http://www.lbp.co.uk/Coatings/Gold.html
  3. http://www.sti.nasa.gov/tto/spinoff1997/hm2.html
  4. http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=2452
  5. http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/gold/
  6. http://www.science.gold.org/

Monday, February 22, 2010

Exodus 26:29 - Gold Plating the parts of the Tent of the Mishkan - Part 1

I've been asked to clarify the details of the golden overlay of the boards (and other parts) of the Tent of the Tabernacle, so here it is... in two parts...

Exodus 26:29

29 And thou shalt overlay the boards with gold, and make their rings of gold for places for the bars: and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold.
‎29 ‏וְֽאֶת־הַקְּרָשִׁ֞ים תְּצַפֶּ֣ה זָהָ֗ב וְאֶת־טַבְּעֹֽתֵיהֶם֙ תַּעֲשֶׂ֣ה זָהָ֔ב בָּתִּ֖ים לַבְּרִיחִ֑ם וְצִפִּיתָ֥ אֶת־הַבְּרִיחִ֖ם זָהָֽב׃
(Please click on the picture to better see all details)

And thou shalt overlay the boards with gold...


...and make their rings of gold for places for the bars...

...and thou shalt overlay the bars with gold....

Here is a close-up that captures all details of this verse...
(notice the corner board rings for the bars)

And this is a close-up on the middle-bottom part of the Northern Wall of the Tent...

And when the boards were put into proper position, they would look like this...

And here is another close-up on the Northern Wall of the Tent...


In my next post I'll explain in much details why the boards would look like this, and not the other way around.

Sunday, February 21, 2010

Exodus 26:26-28 - Tabernacle Tent Boards' Bars

Lets' take a look at the Bars for the Boards of the Tent:

Exodus 26:26-28

26 And thou shalt make bars of shittim wood; five for the boards of the one side of the tabernacle,

27 And five bars for the boards of the other side of the tabernacle, and five bars for the boards of the side of the tabernacle, for the two sides westward.

28 And the middle bar in the midst of the boards shall reach from end to end.

26 ‏וְעָשִׂ֥יתָ בְרִיחִ֖ם עֲצֵ֣י שִׁטִּ֑ים חֲמִשָּׁ֕ה לְקַרְשֵׁ֥י צֶֽלַע־הַמִּשְׁכָּ֖ן הָאֶחָֽד׃

‎27 ‏וַחֲמִשָּׁ֣ה בְרִיחִ֔ם לְקַרְשֵׁ֥י צֶֽלַע־הַמִּשְׁכָּ֖ן הַשֵּׁנִ֑ית וַחֲמִשָּׁ֣ה בְרִיחִ֗ם לְקַרְשֵׁי֙ צֶ֣לַע הַמִּשְׁכָּ֔ן לַיַּרְכָתַ֖יִם יָֽמָּה׃

‎28 ‏וְהַבְּרִ֥יחַ הַתִּיכֹ֖ן בְּת֣וֹךְ הַקְּרָשִׁ֑ים מַבְרִ֕חַ מִן־הַקָּצֶ֖ה אֶל־הַקָּצֶֽה׃
There were five bars for each wall of the Tent of the Mishkan...

When positioned on the walls, it would look like this...

Here is a view on the bars at another angle...

The length of the bars would be, most likely, defined by... the size and location of the Altar Of Incense...

Here is a top view for you, to better reflect the idea...

Therefore, there were:

1) For North and South walls of the Tent, for each of the walls - two bars 19 cubits in length, two bars 10 cubits in length and one bar (the middle bar) - 30 cubits in length.
2) For West wall of the Tent - four bars 4 cubits in length and one bar(the middle bar) 9 cubits in length.

Location of the bars on the walls appear to be related to the length of the curtains, and it was:

1) For North and South walls of the Tent, for each of the walls - one 19 cubits bar and one 10 cubits bar were located 1 cubit off the ground. One 30 cubits bar (the middle bar) was located 5 cubits off the ground, and one 19 cubit bar and one 10 cubit bar were located 9 cubits off the ground.

2) For West Wall of the Tent - two 4 cubits bars were located 2 cubits off the ground, one 9 cubit bar (the middle bar was located 5 cubits off the ground, and two 4 cubits bars were located 8 cubits off the ground.

The thickness of the bars is not given, but it would be logical to assume that it would be equal to that of the bars that were used for the artefacts of the Mishkan... perhaps a hand-grip diameter or ~ 0.06-0.07 cubits(3-4cm)

I have to admit though, that I'm not 100% certain about the length of the bars. I'm still trying to figure out the logic behind their positioning and dimensions...


Here is also a little excerpt from the book called "The book of Exodus: with introduction and notes" By Alan Hugh McNeile.

In his book he documents an opinion of Prof. A. R S. Kennedy, whose insights on some details of the Tabernacle I find very appropriate and useful in my attempt in reconstruction of the Tabernacle...

The frames are strengthened by five bars running through rings. One unbroken bar ran continuously the whole length of a side of the structure, and the other four presumably ran above and below it, at the top and the bottom, two half-length bars in each case being placed end to end, and reaching the whole length. Thus, when inserted in position, there were three full-length bars; and this renders it probable that each frame had three cross-rungs, over which the bars ran. Further advantages of Kennedy's scheme will be seen later.
You can find this book in my Google Library, as well as other books on the Mishkan (see my link bar)

Friday, February 19, 2010

Exodus 26:23 - Tabernacle Tent Corner Boards - Closer Look - Part 4

And now, lets' take a closer look at the corner boards, their tenons, and at how the boards would form a corner of the Tent of the Tabernacle:

Exodus 26:23
23 And two boards shalt thou make for the corners of the tabernacle in the two sides.
‎23 ‏וּשְׁנֵ֤י קְרָשִׁים֙ תַּעֲשֶׂ֔ה לִמְקֻצְעֹ֖ת הַמִּשְׁכָּ֑ן בַּיַּרְכָתָֽיִם׃
The Tent of the Mishkan had two corner-boards, and their four(4) sockets...


Each corner board was made out of two curved regular boards...

Each part of the corner board had a "semi-tube" shape...

Each part of the corner board had tenons in it...

Here is a closer look at the connecting tenons of the parts...

Each half of the corner board had a silver socket made for it...

And was put in this socket like this...

Fitting perfectly...

And, when joined together with the other half, it would form a corner board - a column of sorts...

Then the corner board would connect the adjacent sides of the Tent...

Making a nice looking corner...

Notice the tenon connections...

This is how it would look from above...

And here is one of the completed corners of the Tent...

And here are all the boards of the Tent and all its sides...

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Exodus 26:25 - Tabernacle Tent Corner Boards' Silver Sockets - Part 3

Lets' take a look at the silver corner sockets of the corner boards of the Tent:

Exodus 26:25
25 And they shall be eight boards, and their sockets of silver, sixteen sockets; two sockets under one board, and two sockets under another board.
‎25 ‏וְהָיוּ֙ שְׁמֹנָ֣ה קְרָשִׁ֔ים וְאַדְנֵיהֶ֣ם כֶּ֔סֶף שִׁשָּׁ֥ה עָשָׂ֖ר אֲדָנִ֑ים שְׁנֵ֣י אֲדָנִ֗ים תַּ֚חַת הַקֶּ֣רֶשׁ הָאֶחָ֔ד וּשְׁנֵ֣י אֲדָנִ֔ים תַּ֖חַת הַקֶּ֥רֶשׁ הָאֶחָֽד׃

As you can see, the description says that all sixteen(16) sockets of the Western wall of the Tent were identical -  in weight that is. As per Exodus 38:27, each socket would weigh one (1) Talent of Silver - approximately 17kg.

The shape of the sockets in the corners was different, as they had to connect with the sockets of the adjacent sides of the Tent:

So, there were four identical silver corner sockets...

When put together, they would be able to accomodate two corner boards...

Here is the comparison of the corner socket to the side socket...
From left to right: Corner Socket - Talent of Silver(~12cubic cm)  -  Side Socket

And here is a look inside the socket: just like all other sockets, it was made to be hollow...

And this is how the corner socket would connect to the adjacent side socket...

As you can see, it would fit perfectly...

Such connection would allow the side board to connect with the corner board...

Of'course and again I have to say that this is a very rough approximation of the design of the sockets.
A much thorough inquiry is needed to arrive to the exact and precise understanding of these parts of the Mishkan.

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